Formats Quote

Blues for Buddha

Whether there be prophecies, they shall fail;
whether there be tongues, they shall cease;
whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away.
For we know in part, and we prophesy in part.
But when that which is perfect is come,
then that which is in part shall be done away.
When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood
as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became
a man, I put away childish things.
1 Corinthians 13

BEING CRITICAL OF BUDDHISM ISN’T EASY. Buddhism is the most likable of the major religions, and Buddhists are the perennial good guys of modern spirituality. Beautiful traditions, lovely architecture, inspiring statuary, ancient history, the Dalai Lama; what’s not to like?

Everything about Buddhism is just so—nice. No fatwahs or jihads, no inquisitions or crusades, no terrorists or pederasts, just nice people being nice. In fact, Buddhism means niceness. Nice-ism.

At least, it should.

Buddha means Awakened One, so Buddhism can be taken to mean Awake-ism. Awakism. It would therefore be natural to think that if you were looking to wake up, then Buddhism, i.e., Awakism, would be the place to look.

THE LIGHT IS BETTER OVER HERE
Such thinking, however, would reveal a dangerous lack of respect for the opposition. Maya, goddess of delusion, has been doing her job with supreme mastery since the first spark of self-awareness flickered in some monkey’s brainbox, and the idea that the neophyte truthseeker can just sign up with the Buddhists, read some books, embrace some new concepts and slam her to the mat would be a bit on the naive side, (as billions of sincere but unsuccessful seekers over the last twenty-five centuries might grudgingly attest).

On the other hand, why not? How’d this get so turned around? It’s just truth. Shouldn’t truth be, like, the simplest thing? Shouldn’t someone who wants to find something as ubiquitous and unchanging as truth be able to do so? How can anyone manage to not find truth? And here’s this venerable organization supposedly dedicated to just that very thing, even named for it, and it’s a total flop.

So what’s the problem?
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a marriage with tao

The Great Way is not difficult
for those who have no preferences.
When love and hate are both absent
everything becomes clear and undisguised.
Make the smallest distinction, however,
and heaven and earth are set infinitely apart.

If you wish to see the truth
then hold no opinions for or against anything.
To set up what you like against what you dislike
is the disease of the mind.
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The Killing of Osama bin Laden

by Seymour M. Hersh

“It’s been four years since a group of US Navy Seals assassinated Osama bin Laden in a night raid on a high-walled compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The killing was the high point of Obama’s first term, and a major factor in his re-election. The White House still maintains that the mission was an all-American affair, and that the senior generals of Pakistan’s army and Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) were not told of the raid in advance. This is false, as are many other elements of the Obama administration’s account. The White House’s story might have been written by Lewis Carroll: would bin Laden, target of a massive international manhunt, really decide that a resort town forty miles from Islamabad would be the safest place to live and command al-Qaida’s operations? He was hiding in the open. So America said.

The most blatant lie was that Pakistan’s two most senior military leaders – General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, chief of the army staff, and General Ahmed Shuja Pasha, director general of the ISI – were never informed of the US mission. This remains the White House position despite an array of reports that have raised questions, including one by Carlotta Gall in the New York Times Magazine of 19 March 2014. Gall, who spent 12 years as the Timescorrespondent in Afghanistan, wrote that she’d been told by a ‘Pakistani official’ that Pasha had known before the raid that bin Laden was in Abbottabad. The story was denied by US and Pakistani officials, and went no further. In his book Pakistan: Before and after Osama (2012), Imtiaz Gul, executive director of the Centre for Research and Security Studies, a think tank in Islamabad, wrote that he’d spoken to four undercover intelligence officers who – reflecting a widely held local view – asserted that the Pakistani military must have had knowledge of the operation. The issue was raised again in February, when a retired general, Asad Durrani, who was head of the ISI in the early 1990s, told an al-Jazeera interviewer that it was ‘quite possible’ that the senior officers of the ISI did not know where bin Laden had been hiding, ‘but it was more probable that they did [know]. And the idea was that, at the right time, his location would be revealed. And the right time would have been when you can get the necessary quid pro quo – if you have someone like Osama bin Laden, you are not going to simply hand him over to the United States.’

This spring I contacted Durrani and told him in detail what I had learned about the bin Laden assault from American sources: that bin Laden had been a prisoner of the ISI at the Abbottabad compound since 2006; that Kayani and Pasha knew of the raid in advance and had made sure that the two helicopters delivering the Seals to Abbottabad could cross Pakistani airspace without triggering any alarms; that the CIA did not learn of bin Laden’s whereabouts by tracking his couriers, as the White House has claimed since May 2011, but from a former senior Pakistani intelligence officer who betrayed the secret in return for much of the $25 million reward offered by the US, and that, while Obama did order the raid and the Seal team did carry it out, many other aspects of the administration’s account were false.

‘When your version comes out – if you do it – people in Pakistan will be tremendously grateful,’ Durrani told me. ‘For a long time people have stopped trusting what comes out about bin Laden from the official mouths. There will be some negative political comment and some anger, but people like to be told the truth, and what you’ve told me is essentially what I have heard from former colleagues who have been on a fact-finding mission since this episode.’ As a former ISI head, he said, he had been told shortly after the raid by ‘people in the “strategic community” who would know’ that there had been an informant who had alerted the US to bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad, and that after his killing the US’s betrayed promises left Kayani and Pasha exposed.

The major US source for the account that follows is a retired senior intelligence official who was knowledgeable about the initial intelligence about bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad. He also was privy to many aspects of the Seals’ training for the raid, and to the various after-action reports. Two other US sources, who had access to corroborating information, have been longtime consultants to the Special Operations Command. I also received information from inside Pakistan about widespread dismay among the senior ISI and military leadership – echoed later by Durrani – over Obama’s decision to go public immediately with news of bin Laden’s death. The White House did not respond to requests for comment.

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I have heard….

OshoSufisThePeopleOfThePath

Lao Tzu was going for a morning walk. A neighbour who used to go with him, knew him – knew that he was a very silent man and did not like talking.

Once the neighbour mentioned that the morning was beautiful – it was a beautiful morning. Lao Tzu looked very puzzled. He looked at him as if he had said something mad. The man became restless.

He said, ’What is the matter? Why are you looking at me in such a way? Have I done anything wrong?’

And Lao Tzu said, ’I am also looking at the morning, so what is the point of saying that it is beautiful?

Do you think I am dead, I am dull or asleep? The morning is beautiful, but what is the point of saying it? I am also here, as much as you are.’

Since then the neighbour stopped talking. He used to follow him, walk with him, and after years of going for a morning walk with Lao Tzu he also became alert about what meditation is.

Then a visitor came to the neighbour and he also wanted to come for a walk. And the visitor said that day, ’It is a beautiful sunrise.’ That day the neighbour understood. He looked puzzled as once Lao Tzu had looked puzzled at him, and he said, ’Why should you mention it? I am also here.’

And Lao Tzu said, ’Now do you understand?’ – Osho, Sufis: The People of the Path, Vol. 1

Zero To One

http://www.amazon.com/Zero-One

“Every moment in business happens only once. The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. And the next Mark Zuckerberg won’t create a social network. If you are copying these guys, you aren’t learning from them.

Of course, it’s easier to copy a model than to make something new. Doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. But every time we create something new, we go from 0 to 1. The act of creation is singular, as is the moment of creation, and the result is something fresh and strange.

Unless they invest in the difficult task of creating new things, American companies will fail in the future no matter how big their profits remain today. What happens when we’ve gained everything to be had from fine-tuning the old lines of business that we’ve inherited? Unlikely as it sounds, the answer threatens to be far worse than the crisis of 2008. Today’s “best practices” lead to dead ends; the best paths are new and untried.

In a world of gigantic administrative bureaucracies both public and private, searching for a new path might seem like hoping for a miracle. Actually, if American business is going to succeed, we are going to need hundreds, or even thousands, of miracles. This would be depressing but for one crucial fact: humans are distinguished from other species by our ability to work miracles. We call these miracles technology.

Technology is miraculous because it allows us to do more with less, ratcheting up our fundamental capabilities to a higher level. Other animals are instinctively driven to build things like dams or honeycombs, but we are the only ones that can invent new things and better ways of making them. Humans don’t decide what to build by making choices from some cosmic catalog of options given in advance; instead, by creating new technologies, we rewrite the plan of the world. These are the kind of elementary truths we teach to second graders, but they are easy to forget in a world where so much of what we do is repeat what has been done before.

Zero to One is about how to build companies that create new things. It draws on everything I’ve learned directly as a co-founder of PayPal and Palantir and then an investor in hundreds of startups, including Facebook and SpaceX. But while I have noticed many patterns, and I relate them here, this book offers no formula for success. The paradox of teaching entrepreneurship is that such a formula necessarily cannot exist; because every innovation is new and unique, no authority can prescribe in concrete terms how to be innovative. Indeed, the single most powerful pattern I have noticed is that successful people find value in unexpected places, and they do this by thinking about business from first principles instead of formulas.

This book stems from a course about startups that I taught at Stanford in 2012. College students can become extremely skilled at a few specialties, but many never learn what to do with those skills in the wider world. My primary goal in teaching the class was to help my students see beyond the tracks laid down by academic specialties to the broader future that is theirs to create. One of those students, Blake Masters, took detailed class notes, which circulated far beyond the campus, and in Zero to One I have worked with him to revise the notes for a wider audience. There’s no reason why the future should happen only at Stanford, or in college, or in Silicon Valley.” -Peter Thiel, Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future

Interview with Jed McKenna

The truth is that enlightenment is neither remote nor unattainable. It is closer than your skin and more immediate than your next breath. If we wonder why so few seem able to find that which can never be lost, we might recall the child who was looking in the light for a coin he dropped in the dark because “the light is better over here.” – Jed McKenna, Spiritual Enlightenment, the damnedest thing

Strangers are not for the Opportunist

You always know that an opportunist has gone over the edge when they’re embracing strangers. They’re desperate and their network is falling apart. If you’re an opportunist, strangers are always going to be the most dangerous thing for you. They’re not for you. Anybody that’s new in your life has to come with a recommendation, with an introduction. To be a 4 and to truly be healthy you have to be very disciplined about your relationships. And it’s not easy. There is this natural comraderie that is in the 4th line. And given the construct of peoples designs, some of whom are quite social, it gets very easily confused.

In a sense, the 3-4 are very much about the material plane. The 3 is about the material itself. The 4 is about the resources of the material plane, the human resources and the way they work. One of the things about the opportunist is that they need to look at those beings in their life with a material eye. Given our various cultures and the way in which people consider these things, that wouldn’t be considered very nice or romantic or politically correct, but this is a heretical knowledge, after all, it’s just the truth of it. Are these people going to be good for me; and that often is something that is deeply material. Are they reliable? Can I count on them?

Because remember, it’s not just simply selfish, please understand that. I don’t want to give that impression. The 4 at the same time is doing something that is essential. They are externalizing that secure platform, whatever that secure platform happens to be. They’re the ones that are influencing others. Those that are in their network appreciate that at some level or another, whether they appreciate it to the point that it’s beneficial ultimately to the opportunist is another story, but it’s not like they are taking and not giving.

As a matter of fact, they are the foundation of transpersonal relationships. Everything about the nature of meeting the other in terms of the way the script is written begins at the line level in the 4th lines. If you want to see all of the social paraphernalia of human interaction read all 64 fourth lines and you will see the social dynamic of the transpersonal interaction and the way to bring about influence, those 64 different potential externalizations or influences that there in those 4th lines. – Ra’s Words of Wisdom – Post 130

Source: http://www.ihdschool.com/Blogs

MoonBlog 39.5

Weirdos in the mail

In a FB topic I wrote:

“A hanging Gate is a Gate colored in your Chart in an Undefined Center, a Dormant Potential is a Gate colored in your Chart in a Defined Center. Both types of Gates could be on the other side of your Split that Bridges it. The Not-Self not lives or manifests itself in the Openness of ones Chart only, but it is the mind, using your Openness to make decisions that are not correct for you.”

To which this message comes:

Weirdo: “So Sjef, what was you positive contribution to the poor girl whose fucking head you left spinning? Dude you tend to use your gifts on the shadow side.”

Me: *yawn*

Weirdo: “it is that mean, immature, competitive spirit that makes it so difficult to live here. i know you will not get it… however i needed to say it.”

Me: “I was replying to the other person who just blurted out nonsense, I rather have someones head spin then lied to. The rest is really your own black way of thinking bad things about others and really not my issue love, cheers”

After some contemplation I wrote this also:

Me: “So besides seeing people either as victims or as perpetraders, why are you harassing me with something that is your internal issue? Why do you not go inside yourself and find out why you have an issue with someome correcting basic Human Design knowledge? From which authority do you even dare to come and tell someone else what to do, and impose your morals on, in a private message no less? Next time I will report you. If you have a comment on mine, do it publicly. If you have an issue with someome or something, please resolve the issue yourself where it belongs and not pressure someone else to do it for you. This was free lesson, feel free to book an appointment for another session at my regular fee.”

Weirdo: “Maybe it is time to be mature young friend, and see if you can see beyond yourself, and your need to be seen. One must know their audience, to go to lines and channels before someone has had a foundational reading is pure arrogance and truly thoughtless. Also to speak to your elder in such fashion is pure ignorance.”

Weirdo: “BTW nothing to do with morals, just requesting you to not badger people with all your impressive HD knowledge, it tends to push them away.”

Weirdo: “And I do not have these conversations with you publicly, because I know that you do not set out to hurt, embarrass, try to make people feel less than, or make their heads spin. It is just this way you have of being seen, and I will not fuel that.”

 

Just in case some people wonder why I block certain people 😈 😎
(and yes, I mixed up the hanging gate & dormant potential there)
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