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tree trunk, battle ship, battle cruiser, nuclear submarine, destroyer

https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/33271557
https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/33512201

-PC Status: Overall this PC is performing above expectations (70th percentile). This means that out of 100 PCs with exactly the same components, 30 performed better. The overall PC percentile is the average of each of its individual components.
-Processor: With an outstanding single core score, this CPU is the cat’s whiskers: It demolishes everyday tasks such as web browsing, office apps and audio/video playback. Additionally this processor can handle typical workstation, and even moderate server workloads. Finally, with a gaming score of 90.6%, this CPU’s suitability for 3D gaming is excellent.
-Graphics: 70.5% is a good 3D score. This GPU can handle the majority of recent games at high resolutions and ultra detail levels.
-Boot Drive: 121% is an exceptional SSD score. This drive is suitable for heavy workstation use, it will facilitate fast boots, responsive applications and allow for fast transfers of multi-gigabyte files.
-Memory: 32GB is enough RAM to run any version of Windows and it’s far more than any current game requires. 32GB will also allow for large file and system caches, virtual machine hosting, software development, video editing and batch multimedia processing.
-OS Version: Windows 10 is the most recent version of Windows, and the best to date in our opinion.

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Crescent Moon HDR

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2020 August 24

Made from 14 light frames by Starry Sky Stacker 1.3.1. Algorithm: Mean

Crescent Moon HDR
Image Credit & Copyright: Miguel Claro (TWANDark Sky Alqueva) (posted with permission)

Explanation: How come the crescent Moon doesn’t look like this? For one reason, because your eyes can’t simultaneously discern bright and dark regions like this. Called earthshine or the da Vinci glow, the unlit part of a crescent Moon is visible but usually hard to see because it is much dimmer than the sunlit arc. In our digital age, however, the differences in brightness can be artificially reduced. The featured image is actually a digital composite of 15 short exposures of the bright crescent, and 14 longer exposures of the dim remainder. The origin of the da Vinci glow, as explained by Leonardo da Vinci about 510 years ago, is sunlight reflected first by the Earth to the Moon, and then back from the Moon to the Earth.

Source: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap200824.html